NCERT Class 10 English Solutions: Chapter 2 – Long Walk To

Freedom Part 2

Image of Long Walk To Freedom

Image of Long Walk to Freedom

Image of Long Walk To Freedom

Question 3:

Match, the italicized phrases in Column A with the phrase nearest meaning in Column B. (Hint:

First look for the sentence in the text which the phrase in column A occurs.)

Table of Match, The Italicized Phrases In Column A With The Phrase Nearest Meaning In Column B
Table of Match, The Italicized Phrases In Column A With The Phrase Nearest Meaning In Column B

A

B

1.

I was not unmindful of the fact.

(i)

had not forgotten: was aware of the fact

(ii)

was not careful about the fact

(iii)

forgot or was not aware of the fact

2.

When my comrades and I were pushed to our limits

(i)

Pushed by the guards to the wall

(ii)

took more than our share of beatings

(iii)

felt that we could not endure the suffering any longer

3.

To reassure me and keep me going

(i)

make me go on walking

(ii)

help me continue to live in hope in this very difficult situation

(iii)

make me remain without complaining

4.

The basic and honourable freedoms of… earing my keep…

(i)

earning enough money to live on

(ii)

Keeping what I earned

(iii)

getting a good salary

Answer.

Table of Answer of The Italicised Phrases
Table of Answer of The Italicised Phrases

A

B

1.

I was not unmindful of the fact.

(i)

had not forgotten: was aware of the fact

2.

When my comrades and I were pushed to our limits

(iii)

felt that we could not endure the suffering any longer

3.

To reassure me and keep me going

(ii)

help me continue to live in hope in this very difficult situation

4.

The basic and honourable freedoms of… earing my keep…

(i)

earning enough money to live on

Oral Comprehension Check

Question 1:

Q. What “twin obligations” does Mandela mention?

A. Mandela mentions that every man has twin obligations. The first is to his family, parents,

Wife and children; the second obligation is to his people, his community and his country.

Question 2:

Q. What did being free mean to Mandela as a boy, and as a student? How does he contrast

these “transitory freedoms” with “the basic and honourable freedoms”?

A. As a boy, Mandela did not have a hunger to be free as he thought that he was born free. As

long as he obeyed his father and abided by the customs of his tribe, he was free in every way he

knew. As a student, he wanted certain “basic honourable freedoms” such as achieving his potential of earning his living and of marrying and having a family. He builds the contrast between

these two freedoms by stating that the transitory freedoms by stating that the transitory freedoms

he wanted were limited to him, whereas the honourable freedoms had to do more with his and his people’s position in the society.

Question 3:

Q. Does Mandela think the oppressor is free? Why/Why not?

A. Mandela does not feel that the oppressor is free because according to him an oppressor is a

prisoner of hatred, who is locked behind the bars of prejudice and narrow-mindedness. He feels that both the oppressor and the oppressed are robbed of their humanity.

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