NIOS Data Entry Ch 1 Basics of Computer Input Devices Part 2

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Keyboard

A computer keyboard is one of the primary input devices used with a computer. Similar to an electric typewriter, a keyboard is composed of buttons that create letters, numbers, and symbols, as well as perform other functions.

Image of Keyboard

Image of Keyboard

Image of Keyboard

Mouse

A mouse is a device that controls the movement of the cursor or pointer on a display screen. A mouse is a small object you can roll along a hard, flat surface. Its name is derived from its shape, which looks a bit like a mouse, its connecting wire that one can imagine to be the mouse's tail, and the fact that one must make it scurry along a surface.

Image of Mouse

Image of Mouse

Image of Mouse

Light Pen

A handheld photosensitive device resembling a pen, held to the display screen of a computer terminal for passing information to the computer. Used with a CRT monitor, these devices were an early form of manipulating and highlighting data on the screen.

Image of Light Pen

Image of Light Pen

Image of Light Pen

Optical Scanner

An optical scanner is a device using light beams to scan and digitally convert images, codes, text or objects as two-dimensional (2D) digital files and sends them to computers and fax machines. Optical scanners are used for many purposes, including reading customized response forms, creating automated data fields and recording fingerprints.

Image result for Optical Scanner

Image of Optical Scanner

Image result for Optical Scanner

Touch Screen

When a touch screen is touched by a finger or stylus, it registers the event and sends it to a controller for processing. A touch screen may contain pictures or words that the user can touch to interact with the device.

Tile: Image result for Touch Screen in computer

Image of Touch Screen in Computer

Tile: Image result for Touch Screen in computer

Microphone

A microphone is an example of a transducer, a device that changes information from one form to another. Sound information exists as patterns of air pressure; the microphone changes this information into patterns of electric current. The recording engineer is interested in the accuracy of this transformation, a concept he thinks of as fidelity.

Image of Michrophones

Image of Michrophones

Image of Michrophones

Trackball

It consists of a ball held by a socket containing sensors to detect a rotation of the ball about two axes. It is like an upside-down mouse with a ball that sticks out. The user rolls the ball with the thumb, fingers or the palm of the hand to move a cursor.

Image of Trackball

Image of Trackball

Image of Trackball